Author: greg

Las Vegas Scorpion Control

Scorpions have been around a lot longer than humans. In fact, the species might outlast even the cockroaches as the final creature left standing on the earth one day. DesertUSA says that fossil records containing scorpions’ date back to the Carboniferous Period, more than 450 million years ago. Those tough little critters had gills and claws back then, but they were probably just as tenacious and hard to kill as they are today. This short article looks at some of the more common types of scorpions that exist all around us in the desert.  It will also help homeowners learn how to keep their home and yard free of these dangerous creatures. Characteristics of Scorpions  For homeowners that run across a scorpion in their living space, it can be a frightening experience. The scorpion’s crablike scuttle across a floor, curved tail raised to sting, is unmistakable; when you see one, even if it’s for the first time, you recognize it. There are more than 70 species of scorpions in the United States. All scorpions have eight legs and are members of the arachnid (spider) family. Scorpions have a bony exoskeleton that it sheds and replaces as it grows. With the exception of one type of scorpion in the U.S., their stings are not too dangerous to the average person in good physical condition. But the ill and infirm could...

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Nevada Stink Bugs

Nevada has a lot of bugs hiding in the sands and soil. From scorpions to spiders, bedbugs to fleas, Preventive Pest Control pays close attention to all the creepy crawlies that bug businesses and homes in our state. But the bug problem just got worse. There’s a new bug in town called Chlorochroa Sayi. How will you know if you’ve found one? Take a big whiff. If you smell an offensive stink, you’ve discovered Chlorochroa, more commonly and appropriately called the Say’s stink bug. Ooooh That Smell The State of Nevada Department of Agriculture has a whole page on the Say’s stink bug. Stink bugs are a whole genus of bugs that get their name from a set of glands that release a foul-smelling liquid. When a stink bug is threatened is acts kind of like a skunk, spraying the liquid to deter enemies. On the flip side, the smelly substance actually is attractant to mates. (Evidently, stink bugs think they smell just fine.) According to stinkbugs.org, there are more than 200 different species of these annoyingly smelly bugs. While the western states have a number of different types of stink bugs that plague homeowners in the fall, western Nevada has been invaded by one particular type of stink bug – the Say’s. As stink bugs go, they’re kind of pretty, with an ornate green and yellow carapace. But...

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Top Ten Worst Bugs in Las Vegas

For the sheer gross-out factor, it’s hard to decide if spiders outrank scorpions or silverfish are worse than a centipede. We’ve seen them all and have compiled the top ten bad bugs that plague businesses and homes across the Las Vegas valley. Identifying these pests is just the first step in our life-long ambition to eradicate these bad bugs from your home or office. Bad Bugs in Nevada  Spiders are arachnids, which mean two body sections, eight legs, and no wings characterize them. They like moisture so in the desert many times that means in and around your pipes and in the crawl spaces of your home. Ticks are high on the gross-out list because they live on the blood of mammals. That could mean you – or your pet. They are tiny when not engorged with blood, which makes them hard to spot. Silverfish are a common home pest that can grow at least an inch long with bristly appendages on their front and rear. While harmless, they’re scurrying can make most homeowners climb on a chair to get away. Bees, wasps, and hornets are dangerous to humans and pets. Certain types of bees can be extremely aggressive when crossed. If you spot a nest, be safe, and call us right away. Bed bugs are another small creature that lives on blood. They like to live in places...

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Las Vegas House Hunting — Seven Clues The House Has a Pest Problem

Eradicating pests, whether it’s bed bugs, termites, scorpions, or mice, can be expensive, frustrating, and stressful. If you’ve ever gone house hunting that’s also a stressful experience, especially if you’re also putting your existing home on the market. As you’re looking at homes to purchase you probably know the obvious ways to “kick the tires” before buying. Looking for roof tiles that are missing, or spotting lights that don’t work properly can be signs that the home hasn’t been cared for properly. But we bet the signs of a pest infestation aren’t on your list of checkpoints when searching for a new home. Given the pain and suffering that pests can cause, though, it probably should be. This article will walk you through seven inspection points that will help you spot pests – before you buy. Top Seven Signs Bugs are a Big Problem As you’re walking through a new home, make sure you keep your eyes peeled for some of the following signs of pest problems: Look for small dead bug bodies on windowsills or in corners. Nesting materials such as shredded paper behind the refrigerator. Take a small flashlight with you and look at the back corners inside cabinets for bug bodies, spider webs, or mouse droppings. Use your nose. Bugs have a musty or oily smell. If you smell garbage in a home, which means there...

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Las Vegas Roach Control

Did you know there are more than 20 types of cockroaches in Nevada? If this doesn’t make your skin crawl, you are one tough hombre. The cockroach is one of those creatures that typically make human beings cringe – and rightly so because the lowly cockroach brings a host of diseases and problems when they inhabit a business or home. Let’s look at the two most common types of roaches found in residential and commercial properties in Nevada – and how to prevent them. Types of Roaches in Nevada  The American cockroach, appropriately nicknamed the sewer roach, is all around you. It is one of the most common types of this bug found in the United States. These creatures usually live in alleys or other dark, wet environments (like sewers), but also in bathrooms, kitchens, and the crawl spaces of a home. The American cockroach can grow up to two inches long, and if you see one in your home that’s extremely bad news – because these bugs come in packs. Then there is the Turkestan cockroach is about half the size of the American roach, but it’s just as fast and hard to kill. Turkestan male roaches have yellow or brownish wings while the female has wings with tan stripes. The Turkestan frequents the outdoors, but by June, when the population is at it’s highest, it will start...

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